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What to do when your customer shows up with one of these:

What to do when your customer shows up with one of these:

warning-light

Diagnose the faults:

What caused the issue your customer is currently having? Diesel particular filters are a very precise emissions control that can be affected by even the slightest variation. When a customer arrives at your workshop with the DPF or check engine light on, here are the basic steps that should be followed.  Remember – DPF Removal is not the answer!

 

1. DIAGNOSE THE FAULTS:

a) Vehicle History:

• Where and how has the vehicle been serviced?

• Have there been any similar faults diagnosed previously?

• Has low ash or genuine oil been used?

• What recent repairs have been made? E.g. Head gasket replacement, injectors, ECU reprograms.

 

b) Look at the stored codes, live data and check the following:

• Has Bio diesel been used?

• Over accumulation code?

• Temperature sensor codes?

• Pressure sensor codes?

> Check pressure differential sensor and lines connecting to the DPF for fractures or blockages.

• Air fuel ratio sensor codes?

• EOLYS injection codes?

• Low fuel pressure?

> This can be checked by the manufacturer or well equipped diesel shops.

• Diesel injector codes?

> Leakage can be a common cause of DPF failure and can be tested by diesel specialists.

• Variable vane turbo charger codes?

> Common part for wear and seizure due to high heat and soot.

• Examine live data e.g. temperature sensor readings, pressure differential sensor readings?

• Check EGR, including connection pipes and data transfer lines.

 

c) Ask some basic questions of the customer:

• Do you get out on the motorway or mainly city driving?

• Has the check engine / DPF light been on long?

• Have you seen the light before?

• What were you doing when the light came on?

WARNING: Removing DPF is illegal and will not solve the issue.

d) Look at the stored soot and ash percentages in the ECU:

• These will give a clear indicator of the severity of blockage and determine if the 80% rule applies.

 

e) Other contributing factors that may cause or be affected by DPF failure:

• Catalytic converter efficiency: The catalytic converter plays a large part in the way regeneration occurs. It is what creates the heat required to burn off the soot loading stored by the DPF. A physical check to determine that the catalytic converter is in working order and not melted or fractured is strongly recommended.

> Note: Catalytic converters can be separate to the DPF, part of the main DPF body and also incorporated into the DPF monolith itself.

DON’T FORGET: There is no such thing as a High Performance DPF Filter.  If you are upgrading your exhaust system on your car fitted with a DPF, ensure the new sports system is a DPF-Back system.  Contact us before starting a job like this, as we can help you find the best solution.

2. ATTEMPT A DPF REGENERATION EITHER STATICALLY (FORCED) OR ACTIVELY (WHILE DRIVING AT A SET SPEED AND RPM):

a) This process should only be attempted if the stored ash and soot levels are below 80%. Completion of this process will indicate that the vehicle has not been driven in such a way as to promote scheduled regeneration (these requirements can often be found in the Owners Handbook). It may also indicate issue’s like stored fault codes or programming faults that are present in the ECU.

RECTIFY THE FAULTS (IF DPF REGENERATION FAILS):

a) Refer your customer to a dealer / mechanical workshop to rectify or repair issues causing DPF fault.

b) Check for any outstanding campaigns or ECU updates that have become available.

 

3. INSTALLING A REPLACEMENT DPF:

a) The following process must be observed and adhered to when replacing a Diesel Particulate Filter:

• The engine oil and filter must be renewed with OE parts and liquids.

> Note: To do this the vehicle should be run up to operating temp and then the oil and filter replaced to the correct fill level.

• The new Zetti Emissions Diesel Particular Filter can now be fitted. The engine can not be started or run for any reason from this point until completion of the following steps. This new unit needs to be fitted using either the supplied gaskets kit or parts sourced OE. (Used clamps, gaskets, and hanger can not be used on a new unit.) No silicone sealant or exhaust putty can be used pre or post the catalytic converter or diesel particular filter.

• Reset the ash and soot levels stored in the ECU. All ECU updates and faults need to have been rectified before this process can be carried out. If you are unable to do this with current workshop equipment the vehicle must be towed to a dealer to have this process completed. The engine cannot be started until this has been completed.

• The engine can now be started, bring the car up to operating temperature and perform a regeneration immediately either static (forced) or actively (while driving at a set speed and rpm). If this process is not fully completed, i.e. it gets halfway through and ends or the DPF light is displayed after attempting this process, STOP immediately and recheck faults as there is still an issue with the vehicle.

• If the regeneration completes 100% then the vehicle should be test driven by the workshop for 50-100km before returning to the customer to ensure no further issues are found.

Warning! This is only a guide as to the correct way to identify and rectify issues found with the Diesel Particular Filter. Each manufacturer & vehicle may deviate from this process.

Failure to follow the above directions will result in the Zetti Emissions Diesel Particular Filter warranty becoming void.

For further technical help please consult the original place of purchase.

DPF
DPF

We are passionate about our Zetti Emissions program.  This website exists so Spareco can share their knowledge on the new vehicle emissions being introduced to the Australian automotive industry.  If you are reading this to find out what a Particulate Filter Diesel is, then great.  Or maybe you’ve just asked the question “How much for a DPF Filter?”  You might be ready to buy and just want to know the DPF Filter Price.  As Australia’s largest stockist of Diesel Particulate Filter’s (DPF’s), Close Coupled, Under floor and Manifold Cat Converters, you’ve come to the right place.  Give us a call (on 1300 493 884) or visit our online shop (www.zetti.com) and ask for a quote on our DPF & Catalytic Converter Prices.  We want to help!

When it comes to DPF’s, do the right thing.

When it comes to DPF’s, do the right thing.

The mystery surrounding Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF’s) is understandable, whether you’re an exhaust specialist, mechanical workshop or a dealer, uttering the words Diesel Particulate Filter can send exhaust technicians into a cold sweat.

So why the fear? After all a DPF is a serviceable item; a filter like any other. Or is it?

The fact is a DPF is a filter, but it’s a filter with a few differences. Let’s call it a “smart filter”. The basic workings of a DPF are straight forward although different to a catalytic converter, the catalytic converter and the DPF work together to reduce emissions. A catalytic converter is a flow through device where exhaust gases pass over a substrate coated with precious metals to cause a chemical reaction which in turn changes the makeup of the exhaust gas released into the atmosphere, whereas a DPF is not a flow through device. Its substrate is blocked at the ends forcing exhaust gases through the substrate walls where soot particles are deposited producing a cleaner exit gas.

DPF-internal-diagram

This is an internal diagram of a DPF. It clearly shows that its main function is to clean the exhaust gases by forcing them to pass through the walls of the filter. It is not a flow-through device. The soot build up is then burnt off at high temperatures during the ‘Regeneration’ process.

Once the soot level reaches a certain percentage blocked (measured by pressure sensors before and after the DPF), a value determined by the manufacturer, the DPF needs to be cleaned. This is a process that usually happens automatically and is controlled by the engine management system. The process is known as “regeneration” and will usually happen in one of two ways. “Passive Regeneration”, which happens whenever the vehicle is at operating temperature, but with no other special engine conditions. And “Active Regeneration” which occurs when the vehicle is at operating temperature, running at a predetermined RPM and within a certain time frame, normally upwards of 15min. Once these requirements have been met the engine control module changes injection timing and pulse forcing unburnt fuel into the exhaust system which upon contact with the catalytic converter “fires” leading to a rise in temperature in the Diesel Particulate Filter causing the stored particulate matter to be burnt off. This is a very precise and controlled system, however if the vehicle is only used over short distances or there are other mechanical issues with the vehicle, this regeneration process is not possible. If this continues to occur the Diesel Particulate Filter may reach a saturation of above 80%. Anything above this percentage will require the unit to be replaced as neither active nor passive regeneration can be performed.

Australians are a resourceful bunch. We’ve built our reputation on work-arounds and clever fixes. So why would a DPF be any different? Why not clean a blocked filter with high pressure water or air? Why not superheat it with an oxy acetylene gun or furnace? Why not use a DPF delete pipe or better still why not just “cut the damn thing out” all together?

The fact is that the early DPF aftermarket has already seen many examples of well meaning mechanics and exhaust specialists taking the easy way out or just doing what the customer has asked them to do in order to make an easy sale. Cleaning a DPF with water can result in any residual water turning to steam and cracking the substrate or outer DPF housing. Flushing soot particles further down the DPF with water may block the pores downstream and cause the DPF to fail again shortly afterwards. This method may also cause contaminated water to flow into our waterways leading to environmental damage.

DPF_substrate with holes punched in it

This image shows a DPF with holes punched into the substrate. The owner of the vehicle wanted to make it a flow-through device, as it was blocked. You can see by the colour of the filter, the engine is not running correctly.

Some manufacturers have the DPF substrate not only acting as a Filter but also as a catalyst which is coated with non-corroding precious metals rhodium, platinum and palladium. In these units high pressure air blasting may move or dislodge some of the precious metals resulting in reduced efficiency. This is due to the uncontrolled pressure and flow of the air being passed across the substrate.

Heating a DPF with an oxy acetylene or furnace system is unlikely to heat the unit evenly leading to hot spots or partial meltdown of the substrate, or possible damage or warping to the body of the unit or further blocking of the pores due to no back pressure to remove the burnt off soot particles.

Cutting the DPF out altogether or using a delete pipe carries the greatest risks. Putting to one side the fact that you might be bypassing the legitimate opportunity to supply a replacement DPF or maybe charge appropriately for a correct vehicle issue diagnosis (which may not actually be related to the DPF itself). You might be running the gauntlet with the Department of Transport and inviting your customer to come back to you for answers about EPA fines. You may also void the customer’s insurance policy in the event of an accident and a police report which says the vehicle has been tampered with and is therefore deemed un-roadworthy. In vehicles with time or kilometre based regenerations they will try to regenerate even though there is no DPF present causing large white clouds of unburnt or partially burnt diesel being released from the exhaust system. And in many vehicles the lack of a DPF can cause the vehicle to go into limp mode as well as causing engine light illumination. In fact in some late model cars removal of the DPF may invoke complete shut down of the ECU meaning a trip back to the dealer for reprograming or in severe cases complete replacement of the ECU. The message is clear. When it comes to DPF’s do the right thing the first time.

dpf-removal-is-wrong

It is against the law to remove or modify the Diesel Particulate Filter on any vehicle in Australia. If you are thinking about doing this on any diesel vehicle fitted with a DPF, think again.

An estimated 15 % of diesel vehicles on Australian roads currently contain DPF’s and on current projections that figure could rise to around 40% by 2020. The figures are somewhat subjective and depend greatly on dealer range decisions and other market factors but either way the significance of this to the aftermarket is enormous. Currently most replacement DPF’s are done through the dealer network under warranty but some dealers are now looking to write DPF’s out of their warranty conditions as a serviceable item. Added to this is that aftermarket DPF’s can be as little as a third of the price of OE units which means that the market is now starting to see aftermarket DPF’s as a viable option.

Nissan, Mazda, Ford, Volkswagen, Hyundai, BMW, Citroen, Fiat, Audi, Alpha Romeo, Volvo, Saab, Skoda, Peugeot, Kia, Opel, Renault and Jaguar already all have DPF’s fitted to some portion of their passenger or light commercial ranges with many more manufacturers being forced to do the same with tightening emissions laws.

Australia’s vehicle emission regulations closely follow European standards with Euro 5 already in place for new vehicles and full introduction to be completed by November 2016. From September this year Europe will be operating under Euro 6 regulations with Australia beginning its move to Euro 6 in July 2017. This means that new vehicles entering the Australian market will be subject to progressively tighter emissions controls and the current available technology to help meet these regulations includes the use of catalytic converters and DPF’s. Make no mistake, DPF’s are not going away in a hurry.

So why do people experience so many problems when fitting new DPF’s? As with the introduction of any new technology the secret lies in training and awareness. Before fitting any new DPF a full vehicle history check should be done, checking for evidence of a reason for the DPF to stop functioning. Most DPF’s have a combination of at least four temperature and pressure sensors which need to be checked and replaced if a new DPF is fitted. The engine management unit needs to be reset and a forced regeneration completed to let the vehicle know that a new DPF has been fitted and is operating correctly. Correct engine oil and a new fitment kit should always be used when fitting a new DPF and the use of bio diesel is likely to cause a DPF to reach saturation quicker.

Can you trust an aftermarket DPF to do the job? To some degree this may depend on your supplier and which overseas manufacturer they are using. You need to work with a supplier that has done their homework on the vehicle makes and models available in the Australian market. For example the Nissan Navara D40 has a Thai manufactured and a Spanish manufactured model available in the Australian market. Each model has a different configuration for its DPF heat shield and sensor positions. Without this knowledge you may be supplied with an incorrectly fitting unit. DPF’s that form part of a DPF/Catalytic Converter combination unit must also come with a type approval certificate which ensures they comply to appropriate emission standards. Many of the more established European DPF manufacturers also produce for the aftermarket divisions of the OE manufacturers which means they are more likely to produce a high quality reliable unit. Another consideration is does your supplier have stock on the shelf? If they do not this may mean they are just flying the unit in as required and may not be certain of the unit’s fitment suitability for the vehicle model specified.

There is some excellent diagnostic equipment becoming available to assist with DPF issue diagnosis. A five gas analyser will help identify engine timing issues, ignition problems or incorrect fuel mixture all of which can be leading causes of a blocked DPF. A relatively inexpensive DPF diagnostic tool will allow you to identify a DPF fault code or reset the vehicles ECU and run a forced regeneration on an existing or replacement DPF.

DPFTOOL

The Zetti Emissions DPF Diagnostic Tool can help check fault codes, diagnose DPF faults and perform ‘Forced Regenerations’. When replacing a DPF, it can also help to reset the DPF by communicating with the Engine Management System.

This article is presented to you by Spareco Pty Ltd. Spareco have the largest range of aftermarket DPF’s currently available in Australia covering all the major manufacturers as well as a complete range of diagnostic equipment. Spareco are emissions specialists and are happy to share their knowledge and answer any questions you may have regarding DPF’s. Spareco can be contacted on 1300 4 ZETTI (93884) or visit their trade website at www.zetti.com.

Summary of Emission Requirements

Timetable for Adoption of ADR Emission Requirements: Euro 2-6 Australian and EU Introduction

Light Petrol, LPG and NG Vehicles
Australian Introduction EU Introduction
Euro 2 adopted in ADR79/00 from 1/1/03 to 1/1/04 01/1996
Euro 3 adopted in ADR79/01 from 1/1/05 to 1/1/06 01/2000
Euro 4 adopted in ADR79/02 from 1/7/08 to 1/7/10 01/2005
Euro 5 adopted in ADR79/03 (Core Euro 5)* from 1/11/13 and ADR79/04 (Full Euro 5) from 1/11/16 09/2009 New Models
01/2011 All Models
Euro 6 to be adopted in ADR79/05 from 1/7/17 to 1/7/18 09/2014
Light Diesel Vehicles
Australian Introduction EU Introduction
Euro 2 adopted in ADR79/00 from 1/1/02 to 1/1/03 01/1996
Euro 3 (never formally adopted) 01/2000
Euro 4 adopted in ADR79/01** from 1/1/06 to 1/1/07 01/2005
Euro 5 adopted in ADR79/03 (Core Euro 5) from 1/11/13 and ADR79/04 (Full Euro 5) from 1/11/16 Euro 5a 09/2009 New Models 01/2011 All Models
Euro 5b 09/2011 New Models 01/2013 All Models
Euro 6 to be adopted in ADR79/05 from 1/7/17 to 1/7/18 09/2014

Full details of EU Emissions introduction available at:
Source: dieselnet.com/standards/eu/ld.php
Source: infrastructure.gov.au/roads/environment/emission/index.aspx

ADR79/05 will be formally determined by the Minister when UN Regulation 83 has been amended to incorporate the Euro 6 standards.

Note: In each case, the first date applies to vehicle models first produced on or after that date, with all new vehicles required to comply by the second date.
Euro 5a = Without new particulate measurement technique
Euro 5b = With new particulate measurement technique


*The “core” Euro 5 requirements which apply in ADR79/03 require compliance with all the technical requirements of UN Regulation 83/06 except that ADR79/03:

• allows the provision of PM mass emissions data based on the previous UN R83/05 (Annex 4) Type I test procedure (with a PM mass emissions limit of 0.005g/km) in lieu of data collected under the revised test procedure (Annex 4a of UN R83/06) which specifies a limit of 0.0045g/km);

• accepts a relaxed OBD threshold limit (80mg/km) for PM mass for M and N category vehicles of reference mass >1760kg;

• does not require compliance with the PM number limit specified for diesel vehicles in UN R83/06;

• does not require compliance with the In Use Performance Ratio for OBD systems in UN R83/06;

• does not require the NOx monitoring for petrol vehicles specified in UN R83/06; and

• only requires flex fuel vehicles to meet the Type VI test when tested on petrol (details of requirements for flex fuel vehicles to meet the Type VI test under ADR79/04 and ADR79/05 at low temperature to be determined by 31 December 2011).

**Euro 4 was first adopted for light diesel vehicles in ADR79/01, but was effectively replaced by ADR79/02 from 1/7/08.

 

Summary of Emission Requirements for New Petrol Passenger Cars in Australia 1972 – 2018

Standard Date Introduced # Exhaust Emission Limits (Petrol Vehicles) Source Standard / Test Method
HC CO NOx PM
ADR26 1/1/72 NA 4.5% by vol NA NA Idle CO test
ADR27 1/1/74 8.0 – 12.8 g/test 100 – 220 g/test & 4.5% by vol NA NA ECE 'Big Bag'
ADR27A 1/7/76 2.1 g/km 24.2 g/km 1.9 g/km NA US '72 FTP
ADR27B 1/1/82 2.1 g/km 24.2 g/km 1.9 g/km NA US '72 FTP
ADR27C + 1/1/83 2.1 g/km 24.2 g/km 1.9 g/km NA US '72 FTP
ADR37/00 1/2/86 0.93 g/km 9.3 g/km 1.93 g/km NA US '75 FTP
ADR37/01 1/1/97 – 1/1/99 0.26 g/km 2.1 g/km 0.63 g/km NA US '75 FTP
ADR79/00 1/1/03 – 1/1/04 0.25*g/km 2.2 g/km 0.25* g/km NA UN R83/04 (Euro 2)
ADR79/01 1/1/05 – 1/1/06 0.2 g/km 2.3 g/km 0.15 g/km NA UN R83/05 (Euro 3)
ADR79/02 1/7/08 – 1/7/10 0.1 g/km 1.0 g/km 0.08 g/km NA UN R83/05 (Euro 4)
ADR79/03** 1/11/13
(new models only)
0.1 g/km
0.068 g/km (NMHC)***
1.0g/km 0.06 g/km 0.0045g/km**** UN R83/06 (Euro 5)
ADR79/04 1/11/16 0.1 g/km
0.068 g/km (NMHC)***
1.0g/km 0.06 g/km 0.0045g/km**** UN R83/06 (Euro 5)
ADR79/05 1/7/17 – 1/7/18 0.1 g/km
0.068 g/km (NMHC)***
1.0g/km 0.06 g/km 0.0045g/km**** UN R83/TBA (Euro 6)

Source: www.infrastructure.gov.au/roads/environment/emission/index.aspx

# where 2 dates specified, first date applies to vehicle models first produced on or after that date, with all new vehicles required to comply by the second date.

+ ADR27C introduced a number of administrative changes, based on procedures of ADR37/00.

* ADR 79/00 has a combined HC+NOx limit of 0.5, so the HC:NOx split is indicative only.

** The “core” Euro 5 requirements which apply in ADR79/03 require compliance with all the technical requirements of UN Regulation 83/06 except that ADR79/03: 

• allows the provision of PM mass emissions data based on the previous UN R83/05 (Annex 4) Type I test procedure (with a PM mass emissions limit of 0.005g/km) in lieu of data collected under the revised test procedure (Annex 4a of UN R83/06) which specifies a limit of 0.0045g/km);

• accepts a relaxed OBD threshold limit (80mg/km) for PM mass for M and N category vehicles of reference mass >1760kg;

• does not require compliance with the PM number limit specified for diesel vehicles in UN R83/06;

• does not require compliance with the In Use Performance Ratio for OBD systems in UN R83/06;

• does not require the NOx monitoring for petrol vehicles specified in UN R83/06; and

• only requires flex fuel vehicles to meet the Type VI test when tested on petrol (details of requirements for flex fuel vehicles to meet the Type VI test under ADR 79/04 and ADR 79/05 at low temperature to be determined by 31 December 2011.)

*** Separate Non Methane Hydrocarbon (NMHC) limits only apply from Euro 5 onwards.

**** PM mass limits apply from Euro 5 onwards to petrol vehicles with direct injection engines.

“NA” means no limit applies.

To find the ADRs (except those prior to ADR79/00 which are now obsolete) on the Federal Register of Legislative Instruments (FRLI) follow these steps:

  1. Go to www.frli.gov.au
  2. In the “Browse for” list, choose “Legislative Instruments – As made – by title”.
  3. Wait for the alphabetical list to come up, scroll down to “V” and then click on “Ve” (for Vehicle).

The ADRs will be listed on the screen and you can open each of them individually to get the details.

ADR 79/05 will be formally determined by the Minister when UN Regulation 83 has been amended to incorporate the Euro 6 standards.

 

Emission Limits for Light Vehicles (≤ 3.5t GVM) under UN Regulations 83/.. at Euro 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 levels

Reference mass
(RW)
(kg)
Limit Values (g/km)
Mass of carbon monoxide (CO) Mass of hydrocarbons
[Total and non-methane]
(THC)
(NMHC) (6)
Mass of oxides of nitrogen
(NOx)
Combined mass of total hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen
(THC+NOx)
Mass of particulates (1)
(PM)
Category Class Petrol Diesel Petrol Diesel Petrol Diesel Petrol Diesel Diesel (5)
Euro2 M (2) All 2.2 1.0 - - - - 0.5 0.7 0.08
Euro2 N1 (3) I RW ≤ 1250 2.2 1.0 - - - - 0.5 0.7 0.08
Euro2 N1 (3) II 1250 < RW ≤ 1700 4.0 1.25 - - - - 0.6 1.0 0.12
Euro2 N1 (3) III 1700 < RW 5.0 1.5 - - - - 0.7 1.2 0.17
Euro3 M (2) All 2.3 0.64 0.20 - 0.15 0.50 - 0.56 0.05
Euro3 N1 (3) I RW ≤ 1305 2.3 0.64 0.20 - 0.15 0.50 - 0.56 0.05
Euro3 N1 (3) II 1305 < RW ≤ 1760 4.17 0.80 0.25 - 0.18 0.65 - 0.72 0.07
Euro3 N1 (3) III 1760 < RW 5.22 0.95 0.29 - 0.21 0.78 - 0.86 0.10
Euro4 M (2) All 1.0 0.50 0.10 - 0.08 0.25 - 0.30 0.025
Euro4 N1 (3) I RW ≤ 1305 1.0 0.50 0.10 - 0.08 0.25 - 0.30 0.025
Euro4 N1 (3) II 1305 < RW ≤ 1760 1.81 0.63 0.13 - 0.10 0.33 - 0.39 0.04
Euro4 N1 (3) III 1760 < RW 2.27 0.74 0.16 - 0.11 0.39 - 0.46 0.06
Euro5 (4) M All 1.0 0.50 0.10
(0.068)
- 0.06 0.18 - 0.23 0.0045
Euro5 (4) N1 I RW ≤ 1305 1.0 0.50 0.10
(0.068)
- 0.06 0.18 - 0.23 0.0045
Euro5 (4) II 1305 < RW ≤ 1760 1.81 0.63 0.13
(0.09)
- 0.075 0.235 - 0.295 0.0045
Euro5 (4) III 1760 < RW 2.27 0.74 0.16
(0.108)
- 0.082 0.28 - 0.35 0.0045
Euro6 (4) M All 1.0 0.50 0.10
(0.068)
- 0.06 0.08 - 0.17 0.0045
Euro6 (4) N1 I RW ≤ 1305 1.0 0.50 0.10
(0.068)
- 0.06 0.08 - 0.17 0.0045
Euro6 (4) II 1305 < RW ≤ 1760 1.81 0.63 0.13
(0.09)
- 0.075 0.105 - 0.195 0.0045
Euro6 (4) III 1760 < RW 2.27 0.74 0.16
(0.108)
- 0.082 0.125 - 0.215 0.0045

(1) For compression ignition (diesel) engines only
(2) Except Category M vehicles of which the maximum mass exceeds 2,500 kg. For ADR79/00 (Euro 2) only, category M vehicles with more than 6 seats are also covered by the N category
(3) And those Category M vehicles which are specified in note (2)
(4) A particle number standard of 6.0 x 1011 particles/km will apply to diesel vehicles from Euro 5 onwards
(5) PM mass limits also apply from Euro 5 onwards to petrol vehicles with direct injection engines
(6) Separate NMHC limits only apply from Euro 5 onwards

What is so good about Zetti Cats & DPFs?

What is so good about Zetti Cats & DPFs?

Zetti means quality and that’s what we sell

Our Catalytic Converters are made to the highest quality standards and fit the first time, every time. Our range of European direct fit Catalytic Converters meet strict EURO emissions standards. This will ensure correct fitment and legal requirements are met all with minimal cost compared to factory items.

Made from the right stuff

palladium-rhodium-platinum

The use of precious metals is crucial to producing superior results and by combining Palladium, Rhodium and Platinum to form the composition of the substrate. These precious metals are fixed to the monolith via a Ceria based wash coat. All of the materials used are of high quality and have been tested to ensure product enhancement and ongoing range development.

How they compare

• 1.5mm stainless steel outer shell (opposed to 1.2mm found on others)

• Robot welding process

• 6mm matting compressed to 3mm

• Type Approved replacement parts

• Latest technology wash coat

• OBDII compliance

• Each Catalytic Converter is tested to 30Kpa

• Long service life – 80,000 to 160,000km*

• Product is Warranted

• Packaged for Catalyst protection

• Extensive range

Our EURO range covers all of your needs.
With a comprehensive listing of direct fit, Euro Catalytic Converters and DPF’s, Zetti really is the better choice when it comes to aftermarket replacement.

*Under normal driving conditions.

Zetti’s extensive range of Cats

underFloor-closeCoupled-manifold

Zetti’s massive range has got you covered

We stock a huge range of Manifold, Close Coupled and Under Floor Catalytic Converters with over 2,000 applications covering Australian, European, American and Asian vehicles. We really do have you covered when it comes to Emissions Control Systems.